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Educator Quality Data

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National Accreditation

Wright State University is fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) which transitioned to the Coucil for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) effective July 1, 2013. For additional information on the quality standards that Wright State University's educator preparation programs adhere to, see the CAEP Unit Standards.


Teacher Effectiveness after Graduation

Completers' Impact on P-12 Student Learning and Development

Value-Added: Ohio's value-added data system provides information on student academic gains. The value-added data included are those reported by Ohio's Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS) based on Elementary and Middle School Tests (Grades 4-8) and End-of-Course Tests for high school credit. Value-added classifications are calculated for teachers based on the value-added data of the students they taught. On average, approximately 40% of the employed teachers who earn licenses in the three preceding years receive value-added classifications.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
Wright State-prepared teachers are effective in impacting student learning and development.  For the 2017-2018 academic year, 62% of Wright State University-prepared teachers earned value-added classifications at the three highest levels: most effective (23%), above average (8%), or average (31%).  In two of the last three years, the value-added classifications of Wright State-prepared teachers were higher than those of teachers prepared by all Ohio educator preparation providers.  In 2017-2018, the percentage of teachers earning the three highest value-added classifications for Wright State was 62% compared to 58% across the state. 
A review of the value-added data by licensure area reveals great variation in the number of teachers with value-added data across licensure areas. In 2017-2018, Wright State-prepared teachers with licenses in early childhood (N=6), intervention specialist (N=15), or multi-age (N=1) were less likely to have value-added data than teachers with licenses in middle childhood (N=90) or adolescent to young adult (N=53).  The same was true in 2016-2017 and 2015-2016.  Due to the small numbers for some programs, comparisons by licensure area are of limited value. 

Data Sources

Value-Added Classifications for Wright State University-Prepared Teachers Compared to Teachers Prepared by all Ohio Educator Preparation Providers

Value-Added Classifications for Wright State University-Prepared Teachers by License Type in School Year

 

Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) Results

OTES Classifications: Ohio's system for evaluating teachers (Ohio's Teacher Evaluation System) provides educators with a detailed view of their performance, with a focus on specific strengths and opportunities for improvement. Each teacher is evaluated using the evaluation framework which is aligned to the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession.  Teachers receive an evaluation classification based on their performance.   

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
In 2017-2018, 90% of teachers prepared at Wright State University were rated as “accomplished” or “skilled.” The effectiveness ratings of teachers prepared by Wright State improved as the teachers gained more experience.  For example, 100% of teachers who earned licenses in 2014 were rated as “accomplished” or “skilled” in 2017-2018.

Teachers prepared at Wright State University consistently perform above the state average.  In each of the last three years, a higher percentage of WSU-prepared teachers earned the highest rating of “accomplished” compared to the state average.  Similarly, in each of the last three years, a smaller percentage of WSU-prepared teachers earned ratings of “developing,” compared to teachers across the state. 

Data Source - Ohio Teacher Evaluation System (OTES) Results for Wright State University-Prepared Teachers Compared to Teachers Prepared by all Ohio Educator Preparation Providers


Employer Satisfaction and Completer Persistence in Profession

Employer Satisfaction

To gather information on the quality of preparation provided by their educator preparation providers, the Ohio Department of Higher Education distributes a survey annually to employers of Ohio educators.  Questions on the 15-item survey are aligned with Ohio's Learning Standards, Ohio licensure requirements, and elements of national accreditation.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
Employers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the quality of the preparation provided by WSU. All items on the survey earned a rating of 3.00 or higher (on an agreement scale of 1 to 4). The survey results suggest that employers perceive that WSU prepares teachers especially well to collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators, and staff. When compared to the state results, employers rated the quality of preparation provided by WSU similarly. Each year the lowest rated items on the survey for WSU are also the lowest rated items for the state.  For example, in 2017-2018, items #6 and #7 were low for both.  The lowest rated items on the survey for WSU were also among the lowest rated items for the state: #6 preparing graduates to analyze data to monitor student progress and learning (WSU 3.00 compared to state 3.12) and #7 preparing graduates to use data to plan, differentiate, and modify instruction (WSU 3.11 compared to state 3.13) The highest rated item in two of the last three years was also the same for WSU and the state: #10 preparing graduates to treat students fairly and establish a learning environment that is respectful, supportive, and caring.

Data Source - Employer Perceptions of Ohio Educator Preparation Providers Survey Results: Wright State University Average and State Average

 

Completer Persistence in Profession

Using employment records for Ohio public school districts provided by the state, Wright State University tracks the degree to which program completers remain in the teaching profession.  Completer persistence in the profession is a metric that examines the degree to which program completers who earned licenses and were hired in an education position remain in the field 3 years following recommendation for licensure. 

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
The data reveal that the persistence rate of teachers prepared by WSU is very high.  In 2017-2018, 92% of the WSU-prepared teachers who earned their licenses in 2014 were still teaching in Ohio public schools in 2017-2018.  National data indicate that approximately 50% of new teachers leave the profession within 3-5 years.  Our data indicate that the persistence rate of teachers prepared by WSU far exceeds those national data.  More than 90% of WSU completers earning licenses in 2014 or 2015 were still teaching in Ohio public schools after three years.  

Data Sources

Ohio Program Completers Persisting in the State Resident Educator Program: Wright State University Average and Ohio Average

Wright State University Program Completers Persisting in the Teaching Profession after Three Years


Completer Satisfaction

To gather information on alumni satisfaction with the quality of preparation provided by their educator preparation programs, the Ohio Department of Higher Education administers a survey aligned with the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP), Ohio licensure requirements, and elements of national accreditation.  All Ohio Resident Educators who completed their preparation in Ohio receive an invitation to complete the survey in the fall semester as they enter Year 2 of the Resident Educator program.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
Wright State University-prepared teachers generally indicated a high level of satisfaction with the quality of the preparation they received. Only two items on the 49-question survey received a mean below 3.0 (on an agreement scale of 1 to 4), and a majority of the items on the survey earned a rating of 3.20 or higher. The highest rating on the survey was #6 preparation to align instructional goals and activities with Ohio’s Learning Standards (3.79) while the lowest rating on the survey was #29 knowledge of the state’s Value-Added Growth Measure (2.57). Results across the last three years have varied significantly, with a few areas of consistency.  WSU-prepared teachers consistently rated the preparation they received higher than the state average on items #7, 11, 12, 13, 24, 25, 28, 39, 41, and 44.  These items indicate strong completer satisfaction with the preparation they received in using assessment, classroom management and motivation, strategies for using varied techniques for instruction, and understanding a variety of state standards.  WSU completers also indicate high satisfaction with program faculty opportunities to work with diverse peers.  The only item that was consistently rated lower by the WSU-prepared teachers for the three years was #19 preparation to treat all students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive, and caring.  The lowest rated item on the survey for both WSU and the state for each of the last three years was #29 knowledge of the state’s Value-Added Growth Measure.  However, in two of the three years, WSU-prepared teachers rated the preparation they received much higher than the state average on this item (WSU 3.00 compared to 2.69 state average in 2016-2017 and WSU 3.00 compared to 2.79 state average in 2015-2016).

Data Source - Statewide Survey of Ohio Resident Educators' Reflection on their Educator Preparation Program: Wright State University Average and State Average


Graduation Rates

Graduation Rate after 6 Years - Initial Programs

Wright State University tracks the number and percentage of students who earn a bachelor’s degree after six years.  

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
On average, nearly 40% of undergraduate students who entered the university as a major in the College of Education and Human Services in fall 2010 graduated after six years.   Undergraduate students who entered the university as a major in the College of Education and Human Services were more likely to graduate than Wright State University students as a whole.  For example, 39.2% of undergraduate students who entered through the College of Education and Human Services earned a degree within six years compared to the university average of 35.6%.

Data Source - Number and Percentage of Students Graduating within 6 Years: College of Education and Human Services and University Average Fall 2010 Cohort

 

Graduation Rate after 3 Years - Advanced Programs

Wright State University tracks the number and percentage of students enrolled in advanced programs who earn a degree after three years.  Advanced programs include Master of Education (M.Ed.) programs in literacy or educational leadership (principal) or Education Specialist (Ed.S.) programs in superintendent or curriculum, instruction, and professional development.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends

Teachers pursuing advanced degrees generally enroll at the university on a part-time basis and take approximately three years to graduate.  On average, 60% of students pursuing an advanced degree in literacy or educational leadership graduated within three years.  

Due to variations in the structure and length of graduate degree programs across the university, comparisons are not meaningful.

Data Source - Three Year Graduation Rates and Time to Degree for College of Education and Human Services Advanced Programs 2012-2013 and 2014-2015 Cohorts


Ohio Assessments for Educators (OAE) Licensure Test Pass Rates

OAE Pass Rates - Initial Licensure Programs

As part of the process of becoming a licensed educator in particular areas in Ohio's pre-kindergarten through grade 12 system, candidates must pass licensure examps. Depending on the content area, the tests for initial licensure are the Ohio Assessment for Educators, the ACTFL/LTI examinations for candidates who wish to teach world languages and Praxis assessments in selected areas.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
The results indicate that Wright State University program completers are successful in passing the state-required licensure examinations.  Over the past three years, 96% of Wright State University program completers passed the state’s licensure examinations. Wright State University program completers perform better than the state as a whole on the required licensure examinations.  The average pass rate for Wright State University from 2014-2017 was 2 percentage points higher than the average pass rate for the state as a whole for that same period.
The results indicate that Wright State University program completers perform exceptionally well on the state-required Assessment of Professional Knowledge exams, with 100% pass rate on the exams for early childhood (P-3) and adolescence to young adult (7-12).  The pass rates of 92% for middle childhood (4-9) and 96% for multi-age (P-12) were also high. The pass rates for Early Childhood Education, and all of the Middle Childhood and Adolescence to Young Adult content areas were nearly 100%.  The lowest pass rate was for Special Education, which was 83%.

Data Sources

Initial Programs: Overall Licensure Test Pass Rates Wright State University and State

Initial Programs: Licensure Test Pass Rates by Test Wright State University Completers

 

OAE Pass Rates - Advanced Programs

As part of the process of becoming a licensed educator, administrator, or other school professional, candidates must pass licensure exams.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
Wright State University completers of advanced programs in 2017-2018 performed very well on the state licensure tests. A pass rate of 100% was for Educational Leadership while pass rates of 92% were for Reading Subtest I and II.  Wright State University advanced program completers perform significantly better than the state as a whole on the required licensure examination for Educational Leadership (WSU 100% compared to state 91% in 2017-2018 and WSU 92% to state 83% in 2016-2017).

Data Source - Advanced Programs: Licensure Test Pass Rates Wright State University and State


Employment

Employment in Ohio Public School Districts

The Ohio Department of Higher Education provides universities with employment data annually. The data include Wright State University program completers who were employed in an Ohio public school during the academic year and earned licenses in the three preceding years. The employment data do not include program completers who were employed in private schools or who were employed outside the state of Ohio.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
Across all licensure areas, on average, 61% of Wright State University program completers who earned licenses in 2014-2017 were employed in Ohio public schools one year after earning licensure.  For graduates earning licenses in the period of 2014-2017, those with licenses in world languages, middle childhood education, and adolescence to young adult science education had the highest employment rates in Ohio public schools one year after earning licensure (100%, 89%, 78%). Graduates with licenses in early childhood or health and physical education had the lowest employment rates in Ohio public schools one year after licensure (41% to 46%).
Data indicate that 80% of the 2014-2015 program completers were employed in Ohio public schools three years after earning licensure.  68% were employed in Ohio public schools after one year and 79% were employed after two years.   A review of the employment data by licensure area reveals that Wright State University program completers with the highest rates of employment in Ohio public school districts after three years were those who earned licenses in 2014-2015 in adolescence to young adult science (100%), world languages (100%), middle childhood education (89%), and intervention specialist (89%).  Although program completers who earned licenses in 2014-2015 in early childhood or health and physical education were less likely to be employed in Ohio public schools one year after earning licensure, nearly 80% were employed three years after licensure.

Data Sources

Wright State University Program Completers Employed in Ohio Public Schools – One Year After Recommendation for Licensure

Wright State University Employment Rates in Ohio Public Schools, One, Two, and Three Years After Recommended

 

Location of Employment

The Ohio Department of Higher Education provides universities with employment data annually on program completers who were employed in an Ohio public schools. The employment data do not include program completers who were employed in private schools or who were employed outside the state of Ohio.  Wright State University examines this data to determine where program completers find employment, including employment in the Raider Country region, the university’s partnership school districts, and rural/small town, suburban, and urban school settings.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
For the period of 2014-2018, the vast majority (more than 85%) of Wright State University recent graduates who were employed in Ohio public school districts were working at public schools in the 16-county region in Ohio anchored by our two campuses, called Raider Country.  More than 20% of these teachers were working in one of the university’s nine partnership school districts. Wright State University graduates not only find employment in public school districts in Raider Country, they also stay in Raider Country.  Data indicate that more than 80% of those who got jobs in a Raider Country public school district were still teaching in a Raider Country district after three years.
Wright State University-prepared teachers who earned their licenses in 2014-2015 work in all types of Ohio public school settings.  In 2015-2016, 44% were working in rural/small town districts compared to 34% working in urban districts and 22% in suburban districts.  While only 9% of Ohio’s public school districts are classified as urban by the state, a large percentage of Wright State University-prepared teachers find employment in urban districts. For example, 47% of the teachers who earned licenses in 2013-2014 and 34% who earned licenses in 2014-2015, and who were employed in Ohio public schools one year later, were working in urban districts.  More than a third of the those teachers were still working in urban districts after three years. In contrast, while 71% of Ohio’s public school districts are located in small towns or rural settings, only 31% of the 2013-2014 and 44% of the 2014-2015 licensees who were employed in Ohio public schools one year later were working in small town/rural public schools.  More than 20% of the 2013-2015 licensees who were employed in Ohio one year later were working in suburban public schools.   

Data Sources

Wright State University Prepared Teachers Employed in Raider Country Region

Wright State University Prepared Teachers Employed in Partnership Districts

 

Employment in High-Needs Schools

As an additional measure, Wright State University tracks the percentage of its graduates who address employer needs by working in high-needs schools in Ohio. Data is obtained from the Ohio Department of Higher Education and includes only those teachers who have value-added data and work in schools with high-poverty or medium-high poverty.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
In 2017-2018, less than half of Wright State University-prepared teachers were employed in high-needs schools. When compared to the state average, a lower percentage of Wright State University-prepared teachers were employed in high-needs schools in 2017-2018 (45% WSU-prepared teachers compared to 51% across the state).

Data Sources

Employment in High Needs Schools: Demographic Information for Schools where Teachers with Value-Added Data Servce Wright State University-Prepared Teachers and Ohio Teachers

Wright State University Prepared Teachers Employed in Ohio High-Needs Schools


Consumer Information

Student Loan Cohort Default Rate

A cohort default rate is the percentage of a school's borrowers who enter repayment on certain Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program or William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program during a particular federal fiscal year (FY). The U.S. Department of Education releases official cohort default rates once per year.

Analysis of Results Comparisons with Benchmarks and Trends
The student default rate for FY 2015 for Wright State University was 8.1. Students who attended Wright State University were less likely to default on their student loan payments than students who attended other universities.  The student loan default rate for Wright State University (8.1) was below the Ohio average of 12.2% and the federal average of 10.8%.  

Data Source - Official Student Loan Default Rates for Wright State University, Ohio, and United States

 

Cost of Attendance

Wright State University is pleased to provide student aid calculators to assist in early financial planning for college. The Cost Estimator can provide students and families with an idea of the estimated expenses that could be incurred at Wright State University (minus any financial aid awards) based on costs established for the selected academic term.

 

Salary

Average Minimum Starting Salary by Licensure Area for Wright State University Prepared Teachers, 2015-2016

 

Ohio Department of Higher Education Educator Preparation Performance Report

To continuously improve the quality of educator preparation programs in Ohio, Ohio Revised Code 3333.048 requires the Chancellor of Higher Education and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to establish and publish metrics for institutions of higher education that prepare educators and other school personnel. Reports are available for all institutions and initial licensure programs in the state.

 

Federal Title II Report on the Quality of Teacher Preparation

Title II of the federal Higher Education Act requires annual reports on the quality of teacher preparation. The reports provide information on a number of measures including enrollment, clinical experiences, licensure test pass rates, and other measures.


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