Department of Teacher Education

Fall 2017 Edition

Faculty Spotlight: Lorrie Kubaszewski

Wright State University (WSU) faculty member, Lorrie Kubaszewski, is on her second career path: molding future teachers.

For thirty years, the education instructor introduced Troy Junior High students to the joys of English class. Since retiring from this position in 2013, she has taken up instructing WSU students how to teach.

“I like to say that I’m twice blessed in my life,” Kubaszewski stated. “I was able to teach something I loved for 30 years and then start a new career teaching at Wright State. Who gets to say they’ve had two careers in their lifetime that they love?”

The Chicago native believes that while teaching at the college level is different from teaching younger children, she is up for the challenge.

“It’s given me a sense of energy because I feel like a new teacher again,” she laughed. “I’m really motivated to find the best practices and methods that meet the needs of college students. It’s like putting the pieces of a puzzle together all over again.”

Kubaszewski reports that her overall favorite thing about teaching is it allows her to impact and leave footprints on the future.

“I always hoped that one day my former students would be sitting around the dinner table with their families and start talking about something they learned from their old middle school teacher,” she said. “They’d pass the information on to their kids who might pass it on to their kids, causing a rippling effect of information.”

Along with being a retired middle school teacher, Kubaszewski’s experiences as an alumni from WSU’s teacher education program allow her to empathize with her college students.

“I decided to work at Wright State because I thought it would be a great way to give back to a place that helped me do what I love,” she explained. “I just feel that the Middle Childhood Education program truly prepares these teacher candidates how to teach in a classroom. I’m very proud each time a cohort graduates because I know that there is now an effective teacher somewhere out there and that kids are going to benefit from them.”

To be an effective teacher, Kubaszewski recommends that WSU education majors always keep their students at the center of what they do. She further emphasizes the importance of taking advantage of future opportunities.

“I think that when a door opens, you should walk through it,” she stated. “You never know what you’ll find. Luckily, I just found something here that I love.”